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The "Buggyman"

By Kelly Galloup (tied and revised by Nick Christofeno)


Hooks: gamakatsu b10s Size 4 & 6

Thread: UTC 210 Denier

Flash: Silver/gold or holographic Flashabou  

Eyes: Large Dumbell or tungsten

ARticulation Wire: Rio Bite Wire

Body: Grey or Olive Mallard Flank

Chenille: Gold Polar Chenille

Articulation Beads: Your Choice

Tail: White or grey Marabou

Schlappen: Grey

Head: Senyo's Laser Dub (Grey & Tan)

Fly Rattle: Optional

 

Whisky: Balvenie 14 Carribean Cask (Optional)

 

 

I'll be honest, big fish have always been and always will be my inspiration to fly fish. It is also no secret that big fish like big meals. My goal with this fly was to take an established pattern and tweak it  to match the needs of the Little Elkhart river. My version of the fly is much smaller than Kelly's. It is then tied with an extremely light body with heavy lead eyes, which allows it to get down to where the big boys are quickly. I also tried to use materials that repel water (aside from marabou), making this fly light to cast and easy to sink, without sacrificing the action of this pattern. All materials selected are lightweight, yet come to life and create bulk when they are in the water. Kelly Galloup designed this fly to have a lot of friction in the front half, with little resistance in the back to make the fly swim and flail, like an injured baitfish would. To put it into perspective, the front end of the fly swims slower than the rear, which is comparable to a semi truck hitting the brakes, causing it to weave and swim with an "S" motion. The erratic motion of the fly draws a predatory instinct from the big browns and they cannot resist making a pass at this fly. As previously stated, this fly was originally developed by Kelly Galloup who is The Godfather of modern streamer fishing as we know it. Contrary to its original name, the Bogeyman, this fly doesn't scare the fish away, it draws them out from the undercut banks and logjams in which they sulk under all day. The color pattern should mimic a chub or a shiner, which are a favorite food source of big browns in the Little E. I have had great success with grey/white and olive/white. You can also use rubber legs or include a rattle in this fly to increase your odds when the water is stained or off-color. This is a fly to have in your box in the early spring, fall, or rainy day when the bite heats up. Due to the design of the fly, a jerk-strip retrieve is efficient when stripping this fly in. Make sure to run it by deep log jams and any place you would suspect to hold a lunker. Enjoy!

 
  Steps 1-3:  Place a size 6 Gamakatsu Stinger hook in the vise and make thread wraps from the eye to the bend of the hook. Tie in a small plume of marabou at the bend, then take 4 or five strands of flashabou and tie them in on each side of the fly at the bend of the hook, making sure the flash is slightly longer than the marabou. Then "stack" one more small plume of marabou on top at the bend of the hook. You can take thread wraps up and down the hook to make a body with the marabou you tied in. Your goal is to make a baitfish profile (fan shaped tail, body that gradually gets bigger towards the head.)

Steps 1-3: Place a size 6 Gamakatsu Stinger hook in the vise and make thread wraps from the eye to the bend of the hook. Tie in a small plume of marabou at the bend, then take 4 or five strands of flashabou and tie them in on each side of the fly at the bend of the hook, making sure the flash is slightly longer than the marabou. Then "stack" one more small plume of marabou on top at the bend of the hook. You can take thread wraps up and down the hook to make a body with the marabou you tied in. Your goal is to make a baitfish profile (fan shaped tail, body that gradually gets bigger towards the head.)

  Step 4:  Tie in grey saddle hackle and polar chenille, as if you were tying them for a woolly bugger. I then grab both the hackle and the chenille with hackle pliers and twist them together, brushing out the fibers that get trapped together to give it more volume. Wrap both towards the eye of the hook like you would for a bugger. Tie off and trim excess hackle and chenille, making sure not to crowd the eye as it will interfere with the articulation and action of the fly.

Step 4: Tie in grey saddle hackle and polar chenille, as if you were tying them for a woolly bugger. I then grab both the hackle and the chenille with hackle pliers and twist them together, brushing out the fibers that get trapped together to give it more volume. Wrap both towards the eye of the hook like you would for a bugger. Tie off and trim excess hackle and chenille, making sure not to crowd the eye as it will interfere with the articulation and action of the fly.

  Step 5:  Next, tie in mallard flank on the top of the hook, whip finish, and add head cement if you would like. 

Step 5: Next, tie in mallard flank on the top of the hook, whip finish, and add head cement if you would like. 

  Step 6:  Tie lead eyes onto the bottom of the front hook and add articulation wire. Add three small beads to the wire, leaving about one bead's length in between the last bead and the eye of the back hook. I have found it mandatory to apply zap a gap to the articulation wire and the eyes at this stage because this fly gets slammed and will not last long otherwise.

Step 6: Tie lead eyes onto the bottom of the front hook and add articulation wire. Add three small beads to the wire, leaving about one bead's length in between the last bead and the eye of the back hook. I have found it mandatory to apply zap a gap to the articulation wire and the eyes at this stage because this fly gets slammed and will not last long otherwise.

  Step 7:  Repeat the process that you did for the tail of the fly. Tie in marabou, flash, then another small marabou plume. Now is the time to really build the taper. 

Step 7: Repeat the process that you did for the tail of the fly. Tie in marabou, flash, then another small marabou plume. Now is the time to really build the taper. 

  Step 8:  Repeat the process of tying in polar chenille and this time schlappen rather than saddle hackle. Schlappen is more webby which creates more friction in the water to "pump the brakes" on the fly and give it dat action. It also has a bigger profile, which reinforces the baitfish taper.   Brush out trapped fibers to make it full!

Step 8: Repeat the process of tying in polar chenille and this time schlappen rather than saddle hackle. Schlappen is more webby which creates more friction in the water to "pump the brakes" on the fly and give it dat action. It also has a bigger profile, which reinforces the baitfish taper. 

Brush out trapped fibers to make it full!

  Step 9:  Tie in the mallard flank just like the rear hook. Then, select a tan clump of laser dub and begin to build the head. I would suggest watching a Youtube video on this step if you don't have experience working with this material, as it can be a little tricky at times to get the desired look. 

Step 9: Tie in the mallard flank just like the rear hook. Then, select a tan clump of laser dub and begin to build the head. I would suggest watching a Youtube video on this step if you don't have experience working with this material, as it can be a little tricky at times to get the desired look. 

  Step 10:  Continue your color scheme as you build the head towards the hook eye. You are almost done! Whip finish when you are done building the head. Next, trim the head. You can angle it into a wedge shape to really give the fly some action, but the typical round or bullet shaped head will suffice in this case. 

Step 10: Continue your color scheme as you build the head towards the hook eye. You are almost done! Whip finish when you are done building the head. Next, trim the head. You can angle it into a wedge shape to really give the fly some action, but the typical round or bullet shaped head will suffice in this case. 

  The finished "Buggyman." 

The finished "Buggyman."